http://www.doctordeluca.com/Documents/AlcWomenAffectedMore.htm

Women Report More Disability From Alcoholism Than Men

WESTPORT, CT (Reuters Health) Mar 15 - Women who are stable alcoholics
report significantly more physical and emotional disability than men who are
stable alcoholics or heavy or nondrinkers of either gender.

"What we know about alcoholics we know by following those seeking care for
their disease," Dr. Kyle L. Grazier, of the University of Michigan in Ann
Arbor, told Reuters Health. "These findings are from a general community
sampling and show that alcoholism may more seriously affect women's lives
than those of male alcoholics," she said.

Dr. Grazier and lead investigator Dr. Kathleen Bucholz, of Washington
University, analyzed data from three subgroups of 711 individuals who had
participated in the St. Louis Epidemiological Catchment Area Survey in the
1980's. Dr. Grazier will present their findings during the last week of
March at the First World Congress on Women and Mental Health in Berlin,
Germany.

The investigators conducted baseline and two follow-up interviews and
analyzed medical records for a 24-month period for 133 individuals who met
lifetime DSM-III criteria for alcohol abuse and/or dependence. The
researchers also analyzed similar data for 143 borderline alcoholics and 135
individuals unaffected by alcohol.

Stable alcoholics on the whole reported more disability than nonalcoholics,
Dr. Grazier said but, "female alcoholics reported more disability than the
male alcoholics."

For example, female alcoholics reported more difficulty in activities such
as walking over 1 mile or several blocks or going up one flight of stairs,
as well as greater pain and poorer physical health, Dr. Grazier said.
Compared with male alcoholics and all borderline and nonalcoholics, women
alcoholics, "in general reported that their health limited their
activities," she added.

Dr. Grazier also noted more depression and more serious depression in female
alcoholics than in their male counterparts. Female alcoholics were also more
likely to report changes in sleep, appetite, and ability to concentrate that
lasted up to 2 weeks at a time and that these changes caused problems in
their family and work relationships.

"Depression significantly affected the daily lives of the female stable
alcoholic," Dr. Grazier said. The investigators are still analyzing data to
determine if similar findings will emerge for women classified as borderline
alcoholics.

WESTPORT, CT (Reuters Health) Mar 15 - Women who are stable alcoholics
report significantly more physical and emotional disability than men who are
stable alcoholics or heavy or nondrinkers of either gender.

"What we know about alcoholics we know by following those seeking care for
their disease," Dr. Kyle L. Grazier, of the University of Michigan in Ann
Arbor, told Reuters Health. "These findings are from a general community
sampling and show that alcoholism may more seriously affect women's lives
than those of male alcoholics," she said.

Dr. Grazier and lead investigator Dr. Kathleen Bucholz, of Washington
University, analyzed data from three subgroups of 711 individuals who had
participated in the St. Louis Epidemiological Catchment Area Survey in the
1980's. Dr. Grazier will present their findings during the last week of
March at the First World Congress on Women and Mental Health in Berlin,
Germany.

The investigators conducted baseline and two follow-up interviews and
analyzed medical records for a 24-month period for 133 individuals who met
lifetime DSM-III criteria for alcohol abuse and/or dependence. The
researchers also analyzed similar data for 143 borderline alcoholics and 135
individuals unaffected by alcohol.

Stable alcoholics on the whole reported more disability than nonalcoholics,
Dr. Grazier said but, "female alcoholics reported more disability than the
male alcoholics."

For example, female alcoholics reported more difficulty in activities such
as walking over 1 mile or several blocks or going up one flight of stairs,
as well as greater pain and poorer physical health, Dr. Grazier said.
Compared with male alcoholics and all borderline and nonalcoholics, women
alcoholics, "in general reported that their health limited their
activities," she added.

Dr. Grazier also noted more depression and more serious depression in female
alcoholics than in their male counterparts. Female alcoholics were also more
likely to report changes in sleep, appetite, and ability to concentrate that
lasted up to 2 weeks at a time and that these changes caused problems in
their family and work relationships.

"Depression significantly affected the daily lives of the female stable
alcoholic," Dr. Grazier said. The investigators are still analyzing data to
determine if similar findings will emerge for women classified as borderline
alcoholics.

Alexander DeLuca, M.D., FASAM.
Copyright 1999. All rights reserved.                                                         [Top of Page]
Revised: March 21, 2001.