Alexander DeLuca, M.D.
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Occasional and Controlled Heroin Use - Not a problem?
[Abstract and link to Full Text PDF]

 
Hamish Warburton, Paul J. Turnbull and Mike Hough; Joseph Rowntree Foundation; 2005
 [Identifier: http://www.doctordeluca.com/Library/AbstinenceHR/ControlledHeroinUse05.htm]
[Source: http://www.jrf.org.uk/bookshop/eBooks/1859354254.pdf]
 
Related resources:
Detox and Patient Engagement library  ;   Abstinence and Harm Reduction main library  ;  War on Doctors Academic, Legal, and Reports library
 
See also:
Evidence for Controlled Heroin Use? -
Shewan and Delgarno, British J. Health Psychology, 2005
Some Eminent Narcotics Addicts, and:
The Heroin Overdose Mystery - Edward Brecher; Chapters 5 and 12, "Licit and Illicit Drugs"; 1972
How Bad is Heroin Withdrawal? -
Jara Krivanek; Chapter in "Heroin, Myths and Realities"; Allen and Unwin, Publishers; 1988
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[FULL TEXT of this Report in Adobe PDF format (447 KB)]

ABSTRACT

This report explores the patterns of heroin use among a population of non-dependent and controlled dependent heroin users who saw their use as relatively problem-free.

Little is currently known about groups of occasional and controlled heroin users. This study, conducted by the Institute for Criminal Policy Research, aims to improve our understanding about patterns of heroin use, the nature of dependence and ways of controlling it.

The study describes how this largely hidden population maintained stable and controlled patterns of heroin use. It examines reasons for starting to use heroin, previous and current patterns of use, mechanisms and factors that helped to control use, and why this group saw their use as fairly problem-free. The report draws on a series of in-depth qualitative interviews with heroin users and on an internet survey.

Heroin is a dangerous drug. It can have a devastating impact on individual lives, on users' families and on the wider community. However, as the report shows, some people, in some circumstances, can effectively manage and regulate their use. This raises important issues for treatment. Can dependent and chaotic heroin users learn from the experience of this group? Should controlled heroin use be regarded as an acceptable short- or middle-term goal for clients of drug treatment services? Should popular beliefs about the inherent uncontrollability of heroin dependence be left unchallenged?

The report deconstructs some of the myths surrounding heroin use and heroin dependence. It is relevant to policy-makers, those working in the drug treatment field, academics and drug researchers.

[FULL TEXT of this Report in Adobe PDF format (447 KB)]

[END]

 

Dr. DeLuca's Addiction, Pain, and Public Health Website

Alexander DeLuca, M.D.

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Originally posted: 2005-12-27

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